In Memoriam: Kimo Campbell

Sadly, we have lost one of our own. James Kimo Campbell, long-time activist and leader of the  Pohaku Fund , a donor advised fund supporting environment protection, civil rights and Hawaiian sovereignty housed here at Tides since 1987, passed away on February 16th from complications due to Lou Gehrig’s disease. Kimo was a fighter, an activist who surprised people due to his fiscal responsibility. Known for not only his passion in righting what he believed to be wrong, Kimo shared his intelligence, fairness and his...

Why Is Black History Month Important To Tides?

My Black history: My grandfather was the first, and only, black man to own a small gas station in Elkton, Maryland.  His business development strategy involved hiring a young white man from the community to play the role of “boss” while he worked in the gas station as “the mechanic.”  My cousin was the first black judge in Wilmington, Delaware.  His image was burned in effigy in the town square during the 1960s.  And then there is cousin Grace, devoted mother, wife, and deaconess at the oldest Baptist church...

Facebook’s IPO Part 2: You are a Philanthropist

 

The San Francisco Chronicle estimates that the Facebook IPO will create approximately 900 millionaires. Many believe the ongoing tech boom and tentative resurgence of the US economy are likely to create more millionaires across the country in the coming decades. Against this backdrop, The Chronicle of Philanthropy recently reported that as controversy over the yawning income inequality gap in the US persists, the wealthy are digging deeper to support a more just society at home and abroad. We are heartened...

Black History Month at Tides: Equity In Action

Historian Carter G. Woodson started Negro History Week in 1926 to educate the American people about African-American history and to promote that history as a more significant part of American history as a whole.  Despite his original intentions and the federal expansion of the week into a month, critics rightly argue that African Americans and other people of color are still viewed as the exception to the majority white rule, and that this marginalization continues to be pervasive and at the detriment to economic and social...